The E in CARE is for Encourage:
Suicide Prevention (4/4)

During the month of September (and a little into October), Mary expands her discussions on suicide awareness and prevention because of Suicide Awareness Week. In this four part series, she works to give you the skills needed to talk with people that are displaying symptoms of depression and suicide. Everybody has a role in suicide prevention- anyone can save a life. Take this moment of hope and share this information with others.

For the last few weeks Mary talks about the FACTS and how very important it is to CARE (Connect, Ask, Refer, and Encourage). If you haven’t had a chance to watch and learn more from the previous three suicide prevention Facebook Morning Live videos- we encourage you to when you have a chance. In this Friday Morning Live video, Mary discusses the next step in CARE: Encourage.

Encourage (Part 4/4)

In this special Facebook Morning Live, Mary shares how to talk about suicide, more resources for suicide prevention, and, most importantly, how important it is for community leaders and support staff to have access to suicide resources for their local community. She highlights how important it is to refer people that need help and to give encouragement to find help. She shares her own experiences with how she works hard to get well and stay well. Just like any kind of help you need to keep encouraging yourself to move forward. Remember to get the FACTS , CARE and, as always, keep your hope alive. You can get well. It takes time and continued support but you can do it- you can get through this hard time. You are strong. This is the message that Mary wants you to remember. Please watch and learn more about how to Encourage yourself or others to get help and stay healthy and full of hope.

National Suicide Prevention Line

Don’t wait until the end of this series to get help or help another. Call for help and resources.

Call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or text 741741.

Facebook Live, October 5, 2018

When It’s Time to Refer:
Suicide Prevention (3/4)

During the month of September (and a little into October), Mary expands her discussions on suicide awareness and prevention because of Suicide Awareness Week. In this four part series, she works to give you the skills needed to talk with people that are displaying symptoms of depression and suicide. Everybody has a role in suicide prevention- anyone can save a life. Take this moment of hope and share this information with others.

For the last few weeks Mary talks about the FACTS and how very important it is to CARE (Connect, Ask, Refer, and Encourage). If you haven’t had a chance to watch and learn more from the previous two suicide prevention Facebook Morning Live videos- we encourage you to when you have a chance. In this Friday Morning Live video, Mary discusses the next step in CARE: Refer.

Refer (Part 3/4)

You don’t have to do suicide prevention alone, and it’s not something that is recommended. Get help with the many, many resources available on Holding the Hope’s resource page or simply connect with a person in your area by calling the National Suicide Prevention Line. Remember to get the FACTS , CARE and, as always, keep your hope alive.

National Suicide Prevention Line

Don’t wait until the end of this series to get help or help another. Call for help and resources.

Call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or text 741741.

Facebook Live, September 28, 2018

Ask, Go ahead…you can do it! :
Suicide Prevention (2/4)

For the month of September, Mary is expanding her discussions on suicide awareness and prevention because of Suicide Awareness Week. In this four part series, she will work to give you the skills needed to talk with people that displaying symptoms of depression and suicide. Everybody has a role in suicide prevention- anyone can save a life. Take this moment of hope and share this information with others.

Last week Mary talked about the FACTS (Feelings, Actions, Changes, Threats, and Situations)– these are established symptoms of depression and, also, suicide. If you see these symptoms in a person, then it’s important to CARE (Connect, Ask, Refer, and Encourage). First you Connect meaning to listen, come from a place of concern, and let the person know that you are there and care. Be with them- let them know that they are seen and heard. The next part of CARE is Ask.

Ask (Part 2/4)

Some will shy away from part two of CARE, Ask. They think that merely asking if someone is suicidal will make them suicidal. But what we know is asking about suicide directly and clearly can save lives. It is an invitation to let the person in pain talk about their pain and thoughts of suicide. They are relieved. Your role is to listen. No advice and no plan needed- you just need to actively listen. When they’re talking to you then they are not obsessing about suicide. This is hard for everyone because suicide is a heavy topic. You will have to ask next the No Dodge Question; it is made of three parts. The question is yes or no, in present tense, and direct.

Are you thinking about suicide?

If the answer is anything but a sincere no– that person may be suicidal. If the person you’ve asked tries to keep it a secret between the two of you that’s a yes. Try to connect them with someone that has a professional, medical degree to help them. Watch this video from Mary to learn more, keep hope alive, and CARE.

National Suicide Prevention Line

Don’t wait until the end of this series to get help or help another. Call for help and resources.

Call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or text 741741.

Facebook Live, September 14, 2018

Just the FACTS please:
Suicide Prevention (1/4)

For the month of September, Mary is expanding her discussions on suicide awareness and prevention because of Suicide Awareness Week. In this four part series, she will work to give you the skills needed to talk with people that displaying symptoms of depression and suicide. Everybody has a role in suicide prevention- anyone can save a life. Take this moment of hope and share this information with others.

The FACTS

People get scared when trying to confront and/or help with suicide prevention. Don’t be a Miss Dismiss Ignore- learn the FACTS: Feelings, Actions, Changes, Threats, and Situations. When do you act? Listen to your gut.

Feelings:

Think about another person’s feelings- are they feeling hopeless, down, disconnected- these feelings are notable.

Actions:

Is this person using more drugs or alcohol, giving away possessions, not enjoying their hobbies, pushing people away, isolation, etc?

Changes:

Have you noticed changes in their eating, sleeping, sexual behavior? If so, this can be an indication of depression. Not everyone that is depressed is suicidal- that’s why you need the FACTS. Are these changes new? Communicate with other people that care about this person to see if there are reasons for them being down.

Threats:

If they actual say something in the vein of: “They’d be better off without me.” “No one would miss me.” These are threats to themselves. They can be obvious or vague but listen to a person’s context. Stop and listen.

Situations:

Have they had some kind of loss (job, death, etc) or a change in relationship that may have caused depression in the last few weeks?
Now that you know the FACTS, Mary will be discussing how to help with CARE (Connect, Ask, Refer, and Encourage). This first week she will be discussing how to Connect.

CARE

Connect (Part 1/4)

Let them know they are seen and cared about. Think about what it means to you for you to have a real connection? How would it be best to show you are there? Listen and connect. Learn how with Mary.

National Suicide Prevention Line

Don’t wait until the end of this series to get help or help another. Call for help and resources.

Call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or text 741741.

Facebook Live, September 7, 2018

If You Hire veterans, You Need Mary’s Expertise.

After 10 years working in the suicide prevention field, Mary Jadwisiak provides a series of workshops targeted to increase suicide awareness for youth and adults. Skill building workshops for parents, school staff, corporate HR personnel and community members are based on the latest research. People leave these workshops knowing what to look for and what to do if they see it.

Suicide Awareness and Prevention for the Workplace

If you hire veterans you need this workshop. Twenty-two veterans die by suicide every day—that’s nearly one each hour. The suicide of a coworker will negatively impact your entire organization and increase risk for the ones left behind. Give your employees the power of knowing the warning signs of suicide and the skills they need to act when they see them. This workshop also provides resources for local and national suicide prevention support as well as resources designed specifically for veterans.

Youth Suicide Prevention

After 10 years working in the suicide prevention field, Mary Jadwisiak provides a series of workshops targeted to end youth suicide. Workshops for Parents, School Staff and community members are based on the latest research and promote skill building.

30 – 90 minutes

ASIST — Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training

Go the next step. Take this 2-day interactive workshop to learn suicide intervention skills. This workshop is highly recommended for HR personnel or any professional working closely with the public. The curriculum prepares gatekeepers to integrate intervention principles into everyday practices. Skills and principles are illustrated by case studies presented in video and live dramatizations. Participants have multiple opportunities to practice skills in role-playing simulations and to engage in highly interactive discussions with other participants and workshop trainers. Each participant receives a Suicide Intervention Handbook CD.

Messaging Matters – Containing Contagion

How we talk about suicide matters. Knowing how to talk with media about reporting on suicide is essential to engage them in responsible reporting of prevention efforts. This workshop and keynote is based on industry standards for safely working with media.

Workplace Suicide Prevention: Top Three Systematic And Proven Steps For Saving Employees’ Lives

workplace-suicide-preventionTalking about suicide is tough.  It’s a difficult subject that makes people avert their eyes and lower their voices.  But the truth is, if we want to stop suicide and make our communities and companies safer, we have to talk about it:  Out load and up close.   Let’s start with just how serious an issue it is.

  • At any given time, approximately 5% of your workforce is considering suicide.
  • In 2010 over 38,350 people killed themselves in the United States.  This is a tragedy that leaves families and loved ones reeling with disbelief and confusion.  But the loss doesn’t stop there.
  • According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly 85 percent of all suicides occur among the nation’s workforce, Americans ages 25-65.
  • The impact of suicide on a corporate family consisting of 100,000 employees, with an average of 4 blood relatives per employee, includes:
    • The loss of one employee or family member to suicide every 7 days.
    • Three suicide attempts every day since there are about 25 nonfatal suicide attempts for every reported suicide. (This is a very conservative estimate.)
    •  Some of these attempts result in a significant medical injury and disability, which directly impacts health care costs, particularly for self-insured companies.
      • Paul Quinnett, PhD, Director, the QPR Institute, Spokane, Wash
  • The annual cost of workforce-related suicides has been calculated by Research America to be approximately $13 billion in 2005 dollars.  Research America fact sheet 21

As for veterans, well, although the VA has only been tracking war veteran suicides since 2008, it’s clear that veteran suicide rates appear significantly higher than those among comparable civilians.  On average 22 Veterans die from suicide each day.  That is not a misprint – each day. If your company hires Veterans, a suicide prevention program is essential for your workplace.

“So, what can we do?”   You’re wondering.   “This is too big for us”.  The good news is that there are proven techniques that can help connect people at risk of suicide with help and support.  No company is too small or too big to implement some strategic, uniform suicide prevention efforts that involve the entire company from parking lot attendant to senior management.

Step 1.  Talk about it.

Bring suicide prevention and veterans suicide prevention out of the darkness and into the boardroom, break room, or cubicle cluster.  Create a culture where discussing suicide prevention, resources and warning signs is part of your corporate culture.  TALKING ABOUT SUICIDE WILL NOT CREATE CONTAGION.  Talking about suicide saves lives.  Note:  Ensure that any media campaign follows media safety guidelines as provided by the American Association of Suicidology.

 Step 2.  Educate your workforce. 

There are some very good training programs out there that will help to educate your workforce about the warning signs for suicide.  But, a good program also teaches skills.  That is, what to do when you see those warning signs.  Everyone needs to learn a few awareness skills, such as:

a)     How to ask the question – “Are you thinking of Suicide?”  “Are you so sad you want to kill yourself?”
b)    What to do and where to go for help. – National Suicide Prevention numbers, local crisis numbers and resources for Veterans Suicide Prevention; and
c)     Corporate policies and procedures for helping a person at risk of suicide and/or EAP options.

Some employees like direct managers and HR personnel need to know more, like how to do an intervention and work directly with a person at risk of suicide to create a plan for safety.  Many companies use a tiered approach to skill building based on a person’s position within the workforce.

Step 3.  Create a suicide safer corporate culture. 

Educating people about suicide prevention and empowering them to ask their co-workers directly about suicide is fantastic, as long as employees know they will be supported in their efforts.  Consistent implementation of clear company policies and procedures is necessary to avoid the appearance of punishment for disrupting production or missing goals while helping someone at risk. Clear policies make it easy for everyone to have a hand in saving lives.

Getting Help Works!  Where there is help, there is hope.  You can make a difference by bringing these strategies into your workplace.

For each suicide prevented, the United States could save an average of $1,182,559 in medical expenses ($3,875) and lost productivity ($1,178,684). Research America fact sheet 21 .  More importantly, people thinking of suicide get the help and support they need to heal and move on with their lives.